Jerusalem artichoke, coffee, cacao

This dessert from Nicholas Balfe pairs sweet Jerusalem artichoke ice cream with coffee cake and a cacao nib crumb. Jerusalem artichokes, much like ube in Filipino desserts, bring a pleasant earthiness to this dish which balances out the intense sweetness of the syrup-soaked coffee cake.

First published in 2023
share recipe:

Ingredients

Metric

Imperial

Jerusalem artichoke ice cream

  • 500g of Jerusalem artichoke, sliced on a mandolin into thin rings
  • 1kg whole milk
  • 1kg double cream
  • 500g of egg yolk
  • 200g of caster sugar
  • 400g of liquid glucose
  • 1 pinch of salt

Jerusalem artichoke skin crisps

Jerusalem artichoke and coffee cream

Coffee sponge

  • 500g of soft butter
  • 500g of caster sugar
  • 1 lemon, zested
  • 120ml of espresso
  • 500g of self-raising flour, sifted
  • 10g of baking powder
  • 500g of eggs, beaten, approximately 10
  • 1 dash of whole milk

Cacao Crumb

Coffee Syrup

Equipment

  • Stand mixer
  • Dehydrator
  • Ice cream maker
  • Mandoline

Method

1

You’ll need to freeze the base of your ice cream maker 12 hours in advance

2

To make the ice cream, add the artichoke, milk and cream to a saucepan. Bring to a simmer and then remove from the heat. Leave to infuse for 1 hour then strain through a fine sieve

  • 500g of Jerusalem artichoke, sliced on a mandolin into thin rings
  • 1kg whole milk
  • 1kg double cream
3

Whisk together the egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl until combined

4

Heat the infused milk and cream with the glucose and salt over a gentle heat, stirring occasionally, until it reaches a simmer

  • 400g of liquid glucose
  • 1 pinch of salt
5

Slowly pour the simmering cream mixture into the bowl with the egg yolks, whisking constantly

6

Return the mixture to the pan and cook out over a low heat, stirring constantly, until it reaches 82°C

7

Strain the mixture through a fine sieve and then set aside to cool. Chill in the fridge, covering the surface of the custard with cling film so that it doesn’t form a skin

8

Once cold, churn in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer to the freezer to set until solid

9

To make the Jerusalem artichoke skin crisps, first preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4

10

Transfer the Jerusalem artichokes to an oven-proof dish and add some water, about 100ml. Cover the dish with a lid or foil, and steam the artichokes in the oven for 45 minutes

11

When completely soft, split the artichokes in half and scoop out all the flesh. Leave as little flesh on the skins as possible. Set the flesh aside - there should be around 500g

12

Dehydrate the scooped-out skins at 45°C in a dehydrator for 8 hours

13

Once the skins are fully dehydrated and crisp, heat a large pan with several inches of vegetable oil to 180°C

  • vegetable oil, for deep frying
14

Deep fry the skins for a few minutes until crispy

15

Add the water, sugar and espresso to a small saucepan. Heat over medium heat until the sugar dissolves

16

Add the fried artichoke skin crisps to the syrup, and turn to coat, then set aside on parchment paper until required. Reserve the remaining syrup for making the cake soak later

17

To make the Jerusalem artichoke and coffee cream, first add the 500g cooked artichoke flesh, cream and caster sugar to a pan

  • 500g of double cream
  • 100g of caster sugar
18

Bring to a simmer and warm through for 20 minutes

19

Add the espresso and a pinch of salt, and then blend until smooth. Set aside

20

Next, make the coffee sponge. Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4

21

Grease a full-size gastro and and line it with baking parchment

22

To make the coffee sponge, first beat the butter and sugar in a stand mixer with the paddle attachment. Start on low, and then slowly increase the speed to medium, pausing the mixer to scrape down the sides and the paddle as you go, until the mixture is lighter in colour and fluffy. Add the lemon zest and espresso, and mix to combine

23

Whisk together the flour and baking powder

  • 500g of self-raising flour, sifted
  • 10g of baking powder
24

Reduce the speed of the mixer to low, and add the flour and eggs alternatively - a few spoonfuls of flour and then a little bit of egg - until the flour is fully incorporated. Add a dash of milk to loosen the batter if it’s too thick

  • 500g of eggs, beaten, approximately 10
  • 1 dash of whole milk
25

Use a rubber spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl and check for pockets of flour hiding at the bottom of the batter

26

Bake the cake in the lined gastro for 20 minutes, or until a skewer inserted comes out clean

27

Remove the cake from the oven and let it cool

28

Cut the cake into 6.5cm discs. Level the top of each disk if it’s uneven

29

To make the cacao crumb, first preheat the oven to 170°C/gas mark 3 and line 2 large baking trays with parchment paper

30

Put all the dry ingredients apart from the cacao nibs in a stand mixer with the paddle attachment

31

Add the melted butter and mix whilst on low to medium speed until it forms crumbs. Once combined, transfer the crumbs to the lined baking trays and bake for 18 minutes

32

Allow the crumb to cool completely then break it up with your hands and add the cacao nibs

  • 50g of cacao nibs
33

To make the coffee syrup, whisk together any remaining coffee syrup from making the Jerusalem artichoke crisps with the coffee liqueur and rum

34

5-10 minutes before serving your main course, drizzle each portion of cake with 25-50 ml coffee syrup. You want enough syrup to make the cake pieces very soft and moist

35

Once you’re ready to serve the dessert, squeeze the jerusalem artichoke and coffee cream on top of the cake, then sprinkle a layer of crumbs on top of and around the cream

36

Place a rocher of ice cream on top of the crumb-dusted cream, then add 5-7 thumb nail-sized pieces of Jerusalem artichoke skin crisp around the dish, and one on top of the ice cream. Serve immediately

First published in 2023
share recipe:

Following the huge success of his trio of London restaurants Salon, Levan and Larry’s, Nicholas Balfe relocated to Somerset in 2021 to open his newest venture Holm, where provenance and seasonality play a larger role in his food than ever before.

Get in touch

 
Please or register to send a comment to Great British Chefs
 
You may also like
Cacao
Cacao
Coffee
Coffee
Coffee
Coffee
Robin Gill
Robin Gill
Load more