Spicy gyoza hotpot

PT30M

First published in 2021
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Tim Anderson says: 'I was going to include a recipe for motsunabe, a beloved speciality of Fukuoka prefecture, and perhaps my favourite Japanese hotpot dish. Motsunabe is made from various cuts of pork or beef intestines, simmered in a strongly flavoured miso broth along with pungently aromatic ingredients such as chilli, garlic and garlic chives. Motsunabe is a powerful dish, rich and intense, so it’s right up my street, but I also accept that part of my affinity for it comes from associations with good times and good friends in Japan. If you are a fan of squidgy, squeaky animal parts, I do encourage you to try it. If you’re just not that into guts, no worries – you can still enjoy a similarly punchy, porky, satisfying hotpot in the form of this spicy gyoza nabe. This recipe calls for frozen gyoza – something I always have on hand and highly recommend. But if you want to make your own gyoza from scratch, that’s fine too.'

 

Ingredients

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Imperial

Spicy gyoza hotpot

  • 800ml of chicken stock
  • 800ml of dashi
  • 60g of miso paste
  • 4 tbsp of mirin
  • 1 dried red chilli, thinly sliced, or 1–2 tsp chilli (hot pepper) flakes, to taste
  • 1 Chinese cabbage, cut into large chunks
  • 200g of beansprouts
  • 20–30 frozen gyoza, defrosted
  • 1 red chilli, (fresh) thinly sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1 handful of nira (garlic chives)
  • 1 tbsp of sesame seeds
  • 3–4 portions cooked ramen or udon noodles, or cooked rice

Ponzu

  • 2 1/2 tbsp of lemon, lime or yuzu juice (you can use just one, or mix any or all of the three)
  • 2 1/2 tbsp of soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp of water
  • 1 tbsp of caster sugar
  • 1/2 tbsp of mirin
  • 1/2 tsp vinegar
  • 1 pinch of MSG (monosodium glutamate) powder, or dashi powder (ideally kombu dashi)

Sesame dressing

1

Begin by making the dipping sauces. To make the ponzu, mix everything well until the sugar dissolves. Keep in a jar in the fridge for up to a month (it won’t go off, but the flavours will start to fade)

  • 2 1/2 tbsp of lemon, lime or yuzu juice (you can use just one, or mix any or all of the three)
  • 2 1/2 tbsp of soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp of water
  • 1 tbsp of caster sugar
  • 1/2 tbsp of mirin
  • 1/2 tsp vinegar
  • 1 pinch of MSG (monosodium glutamate) powder, or dashi powder (ideally kombu dashi)
2

To make the sesame dressing, Tip the sesame seeds into a frying pan and set over a medium–high heat. Cook the sesame seeds, stirring constantly, for about 10 minutes until they are noticeably more aromatic and darker in colour. Remove from the pan and leave to cool

3

Coarsely grind the sesame seeds in a mortar, food processor or spice mill, then add the remaining ingredients and stir until the sugar dissolves. Keep in the fridge for up to a week

  • 90g of sesame paste, or tahini
  • 75ml of soya milk, (unsweetened)
  • 1 tbsp of sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tbsp of vinegar
  • 1/2 tbsp of lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tbsp of sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp of soy sauce
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • dashi powder
4

To make the hotpot, combine the stock, dashi, miso, mirin and dried chillies in a large hotpot or casserole dish (Dutch oven) set over a medium heat on a portable stove (if you have one) at the table and bring to a simmer

  • 800ml of chicken stock
  • 800ml of dashi
  • 60g of miso paste
  • 4 tbsp of mirin
  • 1 dried red chilli, thinly sliced, or 1–2 tsp chilli (hot pepper) flakes, to taste
5

Pile in the cabbage and beansprouts and cook for a few minutes until they have softened slightly

6

Pile on as many gyoza as you can fit, then scatter over the red chilli, garlic, nira (garlic chives) and sesame seeds. Place a lid on the pot and boil for about 5 minutes until everything is steamed through

7

Keep the pot at a simmer while eating, so everything is piping hot to the very end. Serve with the ponzu and sesame dressing in small, individual dishes on the side, for dipping

8

When all the veg and gyoza have been eaten, stir the noodles or rice into the reduced broth and polish it off!

  • 3–4 portions cooked ramen or udon noodles, or cooked rice
First published in 2021
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