Red Kuri squash and goat's cheese manti

  • Main
  • easy
  • 2, or 4 as a starter
  • 1 hour 40 minutes, plus a few hours (or overnight) straining time for the squash

PT1H40M

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Ingredients

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Imperial

Manti dough

  • 250g of plain flour
  • 130ml of water
  • 1 tsp salt

Filling

  • 1 squash, Red Kuri variety, weighing approx. 800g
  • 70g of goat's cheese, Neil uses Rosary goat's cheese but anything fresh, soft and creamy will work
  • 1 pinch of grated nutmeg
  • 1 tsp sherry vinegar
  • salt
  • vegetable oil, for drizzling

Burnt butter

To finish

1
Preheat an oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Halve the squash and scoop out the seeds, the season lightly with salt and drizzle with vegetable oil. Wrap the squash halves in foil, then roast for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, remove the foil and roast for a further 20 minutes, then rest until cool enough to handle
  • 1 squash, Red Kuri variety, weighing approx. 800g
  • vegetable oil, for drizzling
  • salt
2
While the squash cooks, prepare the dough. Combine the salt and flour in a mixing bowl, then add the water. Bring together to form a dough then knead for 3 minutes – you don’t want to overwork it. Wrap the dough in cling film and place in the fridge to rest. The dough can also be made up to two days in advance, if preferred
  • 250g of plain flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 130ml of water
3
Once the squash is cool enough to handle, scoop out the flesh and discard the skin. Using a muslin cloth or j-cloth, wrap the flesh in the cloth, ensuring it is fully covered. Place the wrapped squash in a colander with a heavy weight on top to squeeze the excess liquid out. This will take a few hours, but it can also be left overnight in the fridge. Be sure to collect the juice in a bowl
4
After a few hours (or the next day), pour the collected squash juice into a saucepan and reduce until it’s the consistency of maple syrup. You will probably end up with more than the 15ml you need for this dish, but it can be kept in the fridge for up to 1 week and is great for glazing cooked meats or whisking into vinaigrettes and sauces
5
To finish making the filling, weigh out 200g of the pressed squash pulp and combine with the cheese, nutmeg, vinegar and 15ml of the squash syrup. Season to taste, then transfer to a piping bag and set aside (if you don't have a piping bag, you can simply set aside and use a teaspoon to fill the manti)
  • 70g of goat's cheese, Neil uses Rosary goat's cheese but anything fresh, soft and creamy will work
  • 1 pinch of grated nutmeg
  • 1 tsp sherry vinegar
6
Unwrap the manti dough and roll out (dusting your work surface with flour) into a rough square until 2-3mm thick. Trim the sides to make a perfect square, then cut into 5cm squares. Pipe (or spoon) a little of the squash filling into the centre of each square, then begin making each parcel. Fold 2 opposite corners together, pinching the sides as you go, then repeat this with the other 2 corners, to create small parcels as shown in the image above. Set aside until ready to cook
7
To make the burnt butter, add the diced butter to a saucepan over a medium heat, keeping a close eye on the colour and smell. Once it begins to smell nutty and the milk solids turn golden, remove from the heat and add the lemon juice, followed by the Aleppo chilli and zahter leaves. The chilli should turn the butter a bright red. Keep warm until ready to serve
8
Bring a pan of salted water to the boil and blanch the manti for 3 minutes. To serve, mix the yoghurt and garlic together with a pinch of salt and spoon into the base of each bowl. Top with the manti, then pour over the burnt butter
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