2023 food trends: our chefs’ predictions

by Great British Chefs21 December 2022

It’s impossible to know exactly what the next year will hold in the way of food and restaurant trends, but who better to give their thoughts than those working in some of the UK’s most renowned kitchens day in, day out? From set menus to seaweed, we find out what our chefs expect to see more of in 2023.

Great British Chefs is a team of passionate food lovers dedicated to bringing you the latest food stories, news and reviews.

Great British Chefs is a team of passionate food lovers dedicated to bringing you the latest food stories, news and reviews as well as access to some of Britain’s greatest chefs. Our posts cover everything we are excited about from the latest openings and hottest food trends to brilliant new producers and exclusive chef interviews.

Great British Chefs is a team of passionate food lovers dedicated to bringing you the latest food stories, news and reviews.

Great British Chefs is a team of passionate food lovers dedicated to bringing you the latest food stories, news and reviews as well as access to some of Britain’s greatest chefs. Our posts cover everything we are excited about from the latest openings and hottest food trends to brilliant new producers and exclusive chef interviews.

A year is a long time in the world of food. Particular ingredients, techniques and cuisines can be the height of popularity one minute, before quickly becoming yesterday’s news. Some chefs will take note of these trends and adapt their menus accordingly, while others make it their mission to blaze a trail of their own, and that’s exactly what makes our industry both so dynamic and innovative.

2022 has seen zero-waste cookery, fermented foods and Filipino restaurants continue to flourish, while the continued rise of TikTok has thrown the likes of birria tacos, baked oats and butter boards into the spotlight. However, as the year draws to a close, it’s time to start thinking about what the coming year might hold for us in the way of foodie trends, whether it be the rise of certain ingredient, a lesser-known cuisine set to burst into the mainstream, or simply an ethos which we can expect more and more chefs to adopt.

Whilst we could have made our own predictions as to what to expect in 2023, we thought that our brilliant chefs on the site, who live and breathe the industry, would be even better placed to give their thoughts on what the next year might hold…

Shuko Oda - Seaweed
Shuko Oda
Shuko Oda

'Seaweed ticks a lot of boxes with its multiple health benefits, and for me, is an essential part of my cooking and diet. Over the past few years, I seem to hear more and more about seaweed being offered and so it definitely seems to be gaining popularity in usage and consumption. As a Japanese noodle restaurant, we've always had at least six or seven different types of seaweeds on our order sheets. Twelve years ago, when we first opened Koya, very few restaurants would've had seaweed on their menu at all, but now my supplier often tells me that they’re sold out!’

Tom Booton – Laminated Breads
Tom Booton
Tom Booton

‘Laminated breads are all the rage in the chef world at the moment so we may see them come more into the public domain soon. Hopefully double baked croissants may come over from New York also, as they are great!’

Lisa Goodwin-Allen – A further focus on sustainability
Lisa Goodwin-Allen
Lisa Goodwin-Allen

‘I believe that next year, sustainability will become even more of a focus than it is currently. There will be more focus on where restaurants are sourcing their produce from, seasonality and supporting your local area.’

Santiago Lastra – Superfoods and plant-based dining
Santiago Lastra
Santiago Lastra

‘In 2023, I think that we will focus heavily on superfoods and plant-based dishes that are sourced locally. We’ll also see a lot of veg-centric menus, using ingredients like seaweed and wild and medicinal plants from the UK. At Kol, we plan to work with different types of sea plants, seeds and vegetables.’

Chet Sharma – Set menus
Chet Sharma
Chet Sharma

‘I do see more and more restaurants moving to the set format that we’ve adopted here at Bibi, especially smaller places. I think the prix fixe lunch, in particular, is due a big return. As ingredient prices go up, and more restaurants are looking to streamline waste and ensure guests are getting the most value from dining. This is also a reflection of decreased staff availability over the past eighteen months.’

Richard Corrigan – Dublin openings
Richard Corrigan
Richard Corrigan

‘I would say we’ll see a lot more restaurants and hospitality businesses from the UK crossing the Irish Sea in 2022, and setting up in Dublin. It’s such a vibrant city with a thriving food and drink scene. Our new restaurant The Park Café in Ballsbridge has enjoyed a brilliant opening – it’s great to be welcoming fellow Irishman to my restaurant – and I know Hawksmoor’s Dublin opening is set for 2023. I’m certain there will be more to follow…’

Budgie Montoya – Thriving neighbourhood restaurants
Budgie Montoya
Budgie Montoya

'I think neighbourhood restaurants will continue to flourish next year as people feel the financial squeeze and therefore want to support smaller local businesses rather than big chains. There are so many great local restaurants that were born out of the pandemic. I wouldn't want to predict any specific food trends because the industry is so unstable at the moment and there are lots of issues with food supply chains but I think everyone will be focussing on value for money. Personally, I'd like to see more Indonesian food in London because I think it's often underrated and misrepresented.'

Theo Randall – Thrifty eating
Theo Randall
Theo Randall

‘2023 is going to be a frugal year, so I predict that a lot of restaurants will be using more vegetables and pulses in their dishes and will be creative with less expensive cuts of fish and meat. This isn’t a bad thing as it will push the boundaries on creativity and will make dining out even more interesting.’

Harriet Mansell – Diversification of spaces and more experience-led dining
Harriet Mansell
Harriet Mansell

‘I think we’ll see a lot of restaurants diversifying their spaces in 2023 so that they can get the most of out of the venue, adding delis and bakeries into their space so that they can cater to a wider range of customer. We’ll see a lot more experience-led dining, as people will want to get more for their money from dining out; more chefs will begin to incorporate an educational or holistic element to their restaurants in response to the ever-growing trend of wellness.’

Francesco Mazzei – An increased awareness of provenance
Francesco Mazzei
Francesco Mazzei

‘I think there will be even more of a focus on knowing where your food comes from and following the exact chain to suppliers. I think there will be a continued focus on new vegan and vegetarian dishes too. I would love to see people following the Mediterranean diet, eating great quality produce but in moderation. It’s a big movement that’s only going to grow because people are more and more conscious about how they eat these days.’

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