Rosemary brioche

Lee Westcott's delicately flavoured brioche is a firm favourite at Typing Room, where he serves the mini loaves warm with chicken skin butter. This rosemary brioche recipe is perfect for home cooks looking to impress with their bread skills, with the enriched brioche dough offering a rich, buttery flavour and gloriously light texture.

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Ingredients

Metric

Imperial

Rosemary brioche

  • 200g of strong bread flour
  • 5g of salt
  • 24g of sugar
  • 80g of butter, softened
  • 18g of yeast, dried
  • 26g of water, tepid
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 40g of eggs
  • 30g of rosemary, chopped

Egg wash

Equipment

  • Food mixer fitted with a dough hook
  • Pastry brush
  • Mini loaf tins

Method

1
Combine the dry ingredients in the bowl of a food processor. In a separate bowl, whisk together the whole eggs and egg yolks until combined. Dissolve the yeast in the water, then add to egg mixture. With the food processor on a medium speed, add the liquids to the dry ingredients and mix for 5 minutes
  • 200g of strong bread flour
  • 18g of yeast
  • 26g of water
  • 5g of salt
  • 24g of sugar
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 40g of eggs
2
Once the mix is smooth, slowly and gradually add the cubes of the butter until completely emulsified and smooth - this should take approximately 15 minutes. Finally, add the rosemary and mix until it is dispersed evenly throughout the dough
3
Leave to prove for approximately 1 hour, or until doubled in size. Knock back the dough before cutting and weighing into 45g portions. Shape into tight balls and place into mini loaf tins. Leave to prove again until almost doubled in size
4
Whisk the egg yolks together with a dash of milk and use to evenly brush the loaves
5
Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4
6
Cook the loaves for 4 minutes, turn each tin around and cook for a further 4 minutes - do not open the oven door in the first 4 minutes. Remove from the oven, allow to cool for 5 minutes then remove from the moulds and serve
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After formative years with Tom Aikens at his eponymous two Michelin-starred restaurant in Chelsea, Lee Westcott rose to fame at The Typing Room before launching Pensons – a beautiful restaurant with rooms on the Netherwood Estate in Worcestershire.

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