> How to cook

How to cook with linseed

How to cook with linseed

How to cook with linseed

Why not try?

Linseed (also known as flaxseed) has become popular in recent years due to its massive health benefits. Not only high in phosphorus, magnesium and iron, it is high in omega 3 fatty acids, which are good for the heart, and fibre, which aids healthy digestion in the gut. Linseed has also been shown to benefit menopausal women due to its oestrogenic properties.

The UK is the world’s fifth largest producer of this superfood and as it is home grown, it is readily available and much easier on the wallet than superfoods from other corners of the globe. Linseed is available as a brown or a golden seed, but golden is preferred for baking as it will not affect the colour of food.

How to cook with linseed

Linseed is usually available as whole seeds or oil. It is sometimes available ground, but this has a very short shelf life so it is best to buy it whole and grind it yourself. Linseed oil can be used to make hummus, whisked into dressings for salads and added to healthy smoothies. Whole linseeds work well with other grains in cereal, porridge, muesli and flapjacks.

One of the most popular uses for linseed is as an egg replacement. Linseeds are ground and soaked in water; 1 tbsp linseeds to 1 tbsp water. Linseed will never completely replicate what an egg does when substituted for part of a recipe, but as vegan alternatives go it comes quite close as a binder for other ingredients. The gooey mixture of linseed and water works to stick things together, which works well in pancakes, cookies and quick breads but not so great in baking and cakes as is it doesn’t have raising properties. Any recipe which calls for more than two eggs will become too dense if substituted for linseed.

What linseed goes with

Nancy Harbord adds linseed to her vegan-friendly Quorn, chickpea and mushroom burger to help bind them together and Jacqueline Meldrum uses them in her Vegan chocolate and prune brownies.

Linseed can also be used to give crunch and nuttiness to dishes, Simon Hulstone makes a granola for his Duck and hog’s pudding cassoulet as does Michael Wignall for his Cornish skate wing. You could also try Paul Foster’s Duck breast glazed in soy, pickled shiitake and pumpkin seeds.

Comments ()

How to cook with linseed

 
Order by
...   ...

(Editing)

>

This comment was edited

Please enter text

Comments must be less than characters

This comment has been deleted

Report this comment

Please state your report in the space below

Please enter text

Reports must be less than 750 characters

loading

>

Please enter text

Comments must be less than characters

(Editing)

>

This comment was edited

Please enter text

Comments must be less than characters

This comment has been deleted

Report this comment

Please state your report in the space below

Please enter text

Reports must be less than 750 characters

loading

>

Please enter text

Comments must be less than characters

Be the first to leave a comment on this page...
...   ...